Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent Review

Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent | First Look

At a scant 1.8 pounds the Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent is a rare combination, a truly ultralight tent this is also incredibly strong and durable. As such, we think Hyperlite Mountain Gear hit a bullseye in tent design. Compared to most ultralight backpacking tents, the Dirigo 2 is about a pound or 30% lighter while providing 10 to 15% more floor area, and a more generous 45″ peak height. But while it’s larger and lighter,  it’s also stronger and more durable than most ultralight backpacking tents.

What sets the Dirigo 2 apart from most ultralight backpacking tents is its strength to resist high winds and other extreme weather. The Dirigo 2  Tent’s combination of an innovative, linked trekking pole structure and tough Dyneema Composite Fabric is strong enough that we can lean against it. As such, even though Hyperlite Mountain Gear rates it as a 3 season tent, we see it being much closer to a 4 season tent, yet weighs less than most 3 season tents.

In summary, the Dirigo 2 deserves serious consideration for anybody who wants one of the very lightest tents that will also give you peace of mind knowing that it can stand up to severe weather. As for us, we were impressed enough to make it one of our top tent picks in our 2019 Best Backpacking Tents.

Our First Look Video Covering Key Features of the Dirigo 2 Tent

Key Specs

Design:2 person | 3* Season | Single Walled Tent | Trekking Pole Supported
Features:Dual doors & vestibules, full bathtub floor and mosquito netting
Weight:1.8 lb | 28.2oz | 800 g
Area:Main 32.5 ft2 | Vestibules total 28.2 ft²
Fabric:Dyneema Composite Fabric | Walls DCF8 | Floor a stronger DCF 11
MSRP:$795

* For us, it is much closer to a 4 season tent, or 3+ season (at the very least)

Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent Review

What’s Great about the Dirigo 2 Tent

Below we list the key features that make the Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent a standout.

Strong and Light without Sacrificing Features

At 1.8 pounds the Dirigo 2 is lighter than almost all ultralight tents. But it still has an exceptionally strong storm resistant structure, good floor area, double doors and vestibules, and strong, low-stretch and durable Dyneema Composite Fabric (DCF). All combined, they add up to an exceptionally storm resistant and livable tent. This is why we think of it as a 3+ season tent, if not a full 4 season tent.

Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent Review

The figure above shows the main support structure of the Dirigo 2 Tent, a key to its strength. The two trekking poles (red lines) are much stronger and stiffer than thin aluminum tent poles. The trekking poles are solidly linked by a carbon fiber ridge bar at the top (green line) and by a strong seam in the tent floor fabric, a beefy 1.3 oz DCF fabric (yellow line).

Increased Durability

Many ultralight tent manufacturers continue to move towards thinner and lighter fabrics to reduce weight. Unfortunately, this also reduces strength and durability. So much so that the thin floor (sometimes 15d) on many UL tents, really needs a footprint for protection. This is essentially a hidden weight as well as a cost increase.

The Dirigo 2 takes the opposite approach, using strong durable fabrics. Its tent walls are 0.78 oz DCF fabric,  and the floor a tough 1.3 oz DCF fabric that is far more durable than the 20d and 15d floors on most ultralight tents. As such, you can skip the footprint.

Finally, unlike traditional nylon, DCF does not stretch or absorb water when wet (e.g. in strong rain). As such your tent remains taut, without need of adjustment — it’s nice not to have to fiddle with the tent every few hours at night to keep it taut. And when you pack it wet in the morning you can shake most of the rain or dew off and pack the tent without all the additional weight of fully saturated conventional nylon.

Good Ventilation and Condensation Management

Single walled tents are quickly rising in popularity (the Dirigo 2 is technically one). In fact, some single walled tent brands are more popular with backpackers than some well known double walled tent brands. This makes sense, as a single walled tent has most of the benefits of a double walled tent, but for much less weight. But one of the downsides of a single walled tent is condensation on its walls. If you aren’t careful and brush up against the wet walls, you can get your sleeping bag or clothing damp. As such, condensation management is key to making these tents work in damp climates.

Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent Review

This was a very damp camp where we could see our breath before dark. By morning the ground and grass were wet with overnight dew. But the large mesh panels on the Dirigo 2 Tent kept my sleeping bag away from the walls and dry.

The Dirigo 2 shines when it comes to condensation management and ventilation. In fact, with its large mesh panels on the sides, it is very close to being a double walled shelter. Finally, on the ends of the tent (not protected by mesh), the Dirigo 2 has waterproof/breathable eVENT panels that specifically reduce condensation around your head and feet.

To test the tent, we slept out one night in very heavy humidity (we could see our breath before dark). The walls of the tent did condense (as would the fly on a double walled shelter) but the mesh sides keep us away from them. So while the DCF walls of the shelter were wet it never got our bags wet overnight. And yes, the added ventilation of the huge side mesh helps too.

In addition, the Dirigo 2 has a “lazy pitch” which is great for stargazing and ventilation when it’s warm. A “lazy pitch” is setting up the tent with both vestibules fully retracted and tied back. This gives you two large walls of mesh, allowing the breeze to easily flow through the tent — but keeps the bugs out. Bonus: it only takes 4 stakes for the lazy pitch (vs. the normal 8 when the tent is fully staked out).

More Floor Area and Peak Height

In an effort to reduce weight, many UL tents have shrinking floor areas — most are are around 28 Ft2 to 27 ft2, which is snug for two full-sized adults. Again the Dirigo 2 bucks this trend with a generous 32.5 ft2 or about 15% more area. And its generous 45″ peak hight is 5″ higher compared to the average 39″ to 40″ used by many ultralight backpacking tents.

Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent Review

The Dirigo 2 has a generous 32.5 ft2 or about 15% more area than most ultralight tents. Even with two full sized pads in the tent there is a bit of extra room on all four sides.

What’s No So Great

Yes, there are a few downsides to this tent.

High Price

Yeah, that fancy DCF fabric increases cost. At $795 this tent is almost double the cost of a top-end ultralight tent in regular nylon. But comparison to other DCF “tents” the Dirigo 2 is a mid-level cost. By comparison, a Z-packs Duplex is $600, while a TARPTENT STRATOSPIRE Li comes in at $690, and a Big Agnes Tiger Wall 2 Carbon Tent is $1000.

Sloping Tent Walls

Floor area doesn’t tell the whole story of tent livability. Sloping walls reduce sitting up area in in a tent. That is, vertical walls and a flatter tent ceiling increase the area you can sit up in a tent, and sloping walls and a pointy peak reduce it. For more see Pro Tip | How Much Tent Do You Need? Liveable Area – Why Tent “Volume” Matters in our 2019 Best Backpacking Tents | Lightweight & Ultralight.

The Dirigo 2 has moderately sloping side walls, and more sloping walls on the ends. These limit the area of where two people can sit up to the middle of the tent. Even so, the Dirigo 2 is quite livable as it starts with more floor area and a higher peak height than most UL tents, so the sloping walls are not as limiting as they would be in a smaller tent. If you watch our First Look Video of the Dirigo 2 Tent you can see that I have reasonable amount room to sit up in the middle of the tent.

Not Freestanding – Requires 8 Stakes

The Dirigo 2 is not freestanding. As such it can take a bit of time to learn how to set-up and stake it out properly. The Dirigo 2 relies on user supplied trekking poles and requires a few more stakes (8 in total) than most conventional free-standing tents. (Note: the setup is not more difficult than a conventional tent, it’s just that most people are not familiar with how to do it.)

And make no mistake, while you can pitch freestanding tent with a few stakes in fair weather, they pitch better when staked out. That is, in bad weather and/or high winds tents do require all corners and guy-lines be solidly staked out. We’ve seen more than a few tents being blown end-over end across the desert when this was not done.

Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent Review

Conclusion

The Hyperlite Mountain Gear Dirigo 2 Tent may excel (or do very well) in more areas than any tent. But above all it is a rare combination of light, strong, and durable. The Dirigo 2 has two-doors, two-vestibules and above average floor area and peak height. For a single walled shelter it does a great job with condensation management (likely closer to a double walled tent in condensation performance). In summary, while being one of the lightest tents on the market it is also one of the highest performing.

But that performance comes with one significant downside. The Dirigo 2 at $795 is almost double the cost of a top-end ultralight tent in regular nylon. And the Dirigo 2 is not freestanding and requires two user supplied trekking poles an 8 stakes for a storm pitch. Not an issue to our minds but we know folks that feel that way. Finally some folks may just not cotton to a single walled shelter no matter how well it ventilates and manages condensation.

Good For

Backpackers who want an exceptionally light and strong and durable tent with a large floor area and are willing to pay for it. Those who camp exposed in areas of high wind or extreme weather and need the peace of mind knowing their tent can handle it. Optimizers who want the best gear for the task.

Not so Good For

Backpackers on a budget or just abhor high cost gear on principal, hikers wedded to a conventional double walled tent like a BIG AGNES COPPER SPUR HV UL2 or MSR HUBBA HUBBA NX 2P, campers put-off by putting in 8 tent stakes or using trekking poles to setup a tent.

Full Specifications

Weight: 1.75 lbs | 28 oz | 794g
Max Capacity: TwoPeople
Floor Size: 52“ (W) x 90” (L)
Floor Area: 32.5 ft2
Vestibule Area: 28.2 ft²
Number of Doors: Two
Number of Vestibules: Two
Number of Pockets: One Interior hanging mesh pocket
Number of Stakes: Pitches minimally with 4, Optimally with 8

Dimensions

Packed Size: 12” x 8” x 6” | 30.4cm x 20.3cm x 15.2cm
Interior Peak Height: 45″ | 114.5cm
Floor Area: 52″ (W) x 90″ (L) | 32.5sq. ft.
Pitched Dimensions: 92″ (W) x 95″ (L)

Materials

Floor: DCF11
Exterior Walls: DCF8 / DCF-WPB
Vestibules: DCF8
Interior Doors: No-See-Um Mesh
Trekking Pole Grommets: DCH50
Peak Trekking Pole Cups: DCHW

Disclaimer

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase after clicking on the these links, a portion of the sale helps support this site at no additional cost to you. I do not receive compensation from the companies whose products are listed. For product reviews: unless otherwise noted, products are purchased with my own funds. I am never under an obligation to write a review about any product. Finally, this post expresses my own independent opinion.

23 replies
  1. Peter Stair
    Peter Stair says:

    I’ve been toying with the idea of “upgrading” my 2011 Big Sky International Evolution 2P to a tent that uses the DCF material in order to save some weight. The Dirigo 2 is appealing, since it is about the same size as the Evolution 2P. The Evolution 2P was light in its day at 55 oz, including a footprint, but it doesn’t compete with today’s technology. However, the tent weight splits almost evenly between the 2 occupants at 28 oz (Fly+Poles) and 27 oz (Tent+Stakes+Footprint). It appears that the Dirigo 2 is all one piece and can’t be split. If that’s correct it doesn’t save any weight for the guy whose carrying it, relative to my current setup. Am I thinking about this correctly?

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Hi Peter. Just out of the backcountry guiding clients for a couple of weeks. Yes, the Dirigo is all one piece which is pretty standard for a “tarptent” style single walled shelter. As such, there is no way to split the weight between two people. That being said there is no comparison with the 2011 Big Sky International Evolution 2P — the Dirigo 2 is far superior. I am guessing that there are some other easy ways to share weight with your hiking partner. And of course at 1.8 pounds the Dirigo 2 is about the same weight as 1/2 of your BS EV 2P. Wishing you some great backpacking this year. Best, -alan

      Reply
  2. Khan
    Khan says:

    Hi Alan,

    Thanks for your hard work on the site. You really help us whittle down our choices effectively.

    Am I missing something? I wanted to like the Dirigo as a 3+/4 season shelter but it seems like the Ultamid 2 wins again.

    Condensation: This could be a serious design flaw in the Dirigo. Time will tell as long-term reviews come out.

    Size: At 96 x 76 inches the Ultamid 2 is massive. The height of the inner alone is 64 inches. You can hang out, socialize, invite friends, cook, spend the day in, etc. The Dirigo is a regular tent that you basically sleep inside and then (let’s face it) get out. Campsite selection may be an issue, but wind/snow/condensation are less of an issue with the Ultamid than with the Dirigo.

    Weight: In dry weather, the Ultamid’s DCF inner and floor weighs only 1.31 pounds (594 grams). Lighter than the Dirigo. If it’s cold and wet you take both the inner and outer at 2.48 pounds. The weight difference between the Dirigo and the Ultamid, a bomber beast, is then only a scant 6.88 oz (0.43 pounds, or 0.195 kg, or 195 grams).

    Weather Resistance: As you well know, 30 to 60 mph winds are regular features above treeline. It’s anybody’s guess how the Dirigo will fare. The Ultamid has been around for years.

    Modularity: The Dirigo is a fixed system. The Ultamid becomes a lightweight non-enclosed system (1.17 lbs) or a fully enclosed tent (2.48 lbs).

    HMG is targeting the thru-hiker/weekend market at a more competitive price point than the Ultamid, but if one is simply looking for the best 4 season option, isn’t it still the Ultamid?

    Is the above calculus basically correct or am I missing something obvious?

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Hi Kahn, an excellent analysis. You are not missing anything essential. For your purposes (and since you have the $ for the UltaMid 2 combo) I would say it is the right choice for you. Fact is that most backpackers never seriously consider a pyramid. They simply have a knee-jerk reaction about pyramids that “it doesn’t look like a tent,” and instantly disregard it as not suitable for them — not really having done any research in trying to understand what’s great about mids. AND all their friend most backpackers they respect also use tents. Peer pressure is huge. Thus everybody wants something that looks like a Big Agnes Tent or something very like it.

      So for most people it comes down to picking something that passes their “looks like a tent” radar. And then they start down and consider options in that realm. The Dirigo is a standout choice in that realm. Being much stronger and weighing 1/2 of most double walled tents. So HMG offering to appeal to a more “traditional” backpacker looking to save a ton of weight.

      Personally, I think the condensation issue has been way over-hyped — hit some sort of viral up spiral – I have been using mids and tarptents for years (with down bags and jackets) and condensation has rarely been a serious issue. And nothing that a 1 oz pack towel can’t clean up off the floor in about 90 seconds. Just my two cents. Wishing you a great year of trekking. Warmest, -alan

      Reply
  3. Peterson Tooke
    Peterson Tooke says:

    Hi –
    Thank you for the write up, much appreciated.
    I cannot really see the detail properly but it appears that the bathtub inner is directly attached to the tent fly panels at each end… Correct? And if so, then condensation might drip down and accumulate directly into the inner… did you experience any of this?

    cheers – Peter

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Good Q Peterson. So a number of people have posted about condensation in the HMG Dirigo 2 Tent. So here’s a more detailed account.

      First, we had hugely condensing night. We were in a humid riverbed and the temp was in the 70’s during the day and plummeted at dusk and went down to freezing by early morning. A such, the humidity and condensation was extremely high. We could see our breath before dark, and when taking astro photos at around 9:00 the ground and rocks were already wet with sweating. So a great test environment to see how the Dirigo did with condensation.

      The Dirigo 2 is well vented with the huge mesh panels on either side. And I pitched it with the vestibules off the ground a bit to increase air circulation and venting. When I woke in the morning, there was just a light layer of condensation on the walls of the tent – not visually perceptible you had to touch the walls to feel it. Nothing dripped on me overnight and nothing had run down the walls. Take home, is that condensation was well controlled by ventilation.

      So to be clear, the walls weren’t close to dripping or running down. I simply moved my fingers around to pool the water up enough to see if it would fall off in a drip, or run down the walls. It ran down the walls. But again, I had to force it to do this.

      All that being said, the two end/ceiling panels (not the vestibule panels) do connect ot the bathtub floor. So if for some reason the tent condensed enough to run down those panels it would end up on the floor of the tent. But again, this did not happen on a very humid night. -alan

      Reply
  4. William Chilton
    William Chilton says:

    In the video, you say that the condensation ran down the steep end walls. There has been some speculation online that condensation will run down onto the groundsheet.floor. Could you comment on this?

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Good Q William. So a number of people have posted about condensation in the HMG Dirigo 2 Tent. So here’s a more detailed account.

      First, we had hugely condensing night. We were in a humid riverbed and the temp was in the 70’s during the day and plummeted at dusk and went down to freezing by early morning. A such, the humidity and condensation was extremely high. We could see our breath before dark, and when taking astro photos at around 9:00 the ground and rocks were already wet with sweating. So a great test environment to see how the Dirigo did with condensation.

      The Dirigo 2 is well vented with the huge mesh panels on either side. And I pitched it with the vestibules off the ground a bit to increase air circulation and venting. When I woke in the morning, there was just a light layer of condensation on the walls of the tent – not visually perceptible you had to touch the walls to feel it. Nothing dripped on me overnight and nothing had run down the walls. Take home, is that condensation was well controlled by ventilation.

      So to be clear, the walls weren’t close to dripping or running down. I simply moved my fingers around to pool the water up enough to see if it would fall off in a drip, or run down the walls. It ran down the walls. But again, I had to force it to do this.

      All that being said, the two end/ceiling panels (not the vestibule panels) do connect ot the bathtub floor. So if for some reason the tent condensed enough to run down those panels it would end up on the floor of the tent. But again, this did not happen on a very humid night. -alan

      Reply
  5. Joel
    Joel says:

    HI Alan,

    Thanks for the informative and timely review.

    I like that the Dirigo seems to be more of a true 2 person tent than some other UL offerings (in that it is able to fit 2 wide pads).

    I’m still torn between this and a Triplex. The triplex seems to be lighter and slightly larger but require a lot more staking out and larger area to pitch. Whereas the Dirigo seems like it will have less headroom and might be less comfortable if you’re stuck in it on a rainy day.

    How would you compare these two for a couple that is looking to go on a trip similar to your SoSHR or one of Skurka’s 7 day guided trips in Yosemite?

    Is there a clear winner in your mind or is it going to come down to personal preference?

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Good Q Joel. Please take a peek at my response to Michael Long below as it has at least some relevance to your Q. I think this is going to boil down to how much potential high wind to you expect to expose the tent to. While the Triplex is larger and lighter in an exposed camp above treeline it’s not going to be able to deal with high winds as well as the Dirigo 2. So if you think you can get into a sheltered area every night then the Triplex will be fine. But if you think that you might end up above treeline in a violent storm, then I would rather have the Dirigo 2. There can be some violent storms with high winds in the Sierras, and I have been caught out in them above treeline more often than I would like. So in the end it comes down to livable volume vs. storm and high wind resistance, combined with where you think you’ll camp. But to be clear no right or wrong choice — much of it is going boil down to personal preference and camping style. For me, knowing how I hike in the sierras, I would take the Dirigo 2. Hope this helps. Warmest, -alan & alison

      Reply
      • joel
        joel says:

        Thanks Alan (& Allison!) That gives us something to consider as we make our choice. I appreciate the work you both do here and am bummed we can’t join you on your hike you are leading in WV this year.

        Reply
    • Drew
      Drew says:

      Joel – I have a Triplex that my wife and I used for the JMT and some other trips, so I have fairly good experience with it. It doesn’t require a lot more staking. It requires 6 stakes (4 corners + 2 doors), but if you want to really batten it down, you can use 8 or even 10 stakes (2 midpanel and 2 bottom edge).

      As Alan explained, the Dirigo technically can be used with 4 stakes if you don’t use the vestibules, but it was designed to need all 8 stakes vs. 6 with the duplex/triplex.

      The Triplex has vertical side doors, so in normal rain (light/no wind), it won’t get inside the tent. With the Dirigo, when you open the door in the rain, it can get right into the tent.

      The vertical side walls + extra 8 inches (60″ wide) of width means the Triplex has significantly more livable volume and floor space (37.5sqft vs 32.5sqft).

      The triplex is around 6 ounces lighter and $100 cheaper than the Dirigo, while the Dirigo is ostensibly more durable due to the heavier DCF.

      I’ve used the Triplex in strong winds at Evolution Lake in the Sierra and while the DCF panels became noisy, I never become concerned that the tent would blow away or collapse. On this point, a trekking pole based shelter can do well in heavy winds with proper staking and a low pitch, and proper site selection. I can’t say I’ve used my Triplex in 30MPH winds, and I won’t try to estimate wind speed it is often overestimated by a factor of 2. I can just say I’ve been in winds with the Triplex that would quickly blow a hat off your head and several yards away within a couple seconds. At any rate, if wind is the main concern, I would go with a ‘mid (HMG Ultamid 2 or Locus Gear Hapi) or a tunnel-tent like a Hilleberg.

      On a less technical point – if you’re into trying/buying/selling gear, Zpacks stuff usually has much better resale value than HMG products, so when buying shelters that cost several hundred dollars, I think this is a valid point to consider.

      Disclaimer: My current gear includes an HMG backpack and a Zpacks Triplex. I am not in favor of one company or the other, I just like what works best (I tried to like the Zpacks Arc Blast, but couldn’t).

      Reply
      • Alan Dixon
        Alan Dixon says:

        Thanks for sharing your experience with the Triplex Drew. I’m sure that readers will find it useful. Best, -alan

        Reply
      • Joel
        Joel says:

        Thank you so much Drew. It is great to hear a first hand account with similar use cases. We actually ordered a triplex last night so I’m looking forward to trying it out. You seem happy with yours and it is good to know if we really dislike it there is a good secondary market to sell.

        Reply
      • Alan Dixon
        Alan Dixon says:

        Oh, and I would point out that the Dirigo has a much stronger tent overall — and not just because of the fabric. An integrated pyramid triangle pole structure (blunted a bit at the top, but essentially triangle one of the structurally strongest shapes vs. the rectangle on the Triplex) is linked directly into the tent floor seam, faceted fabric panels with seams in critical places (really load transfer cables) to keep the structure taut, and it has a more windshedding design. All combined create a far more wind resistant tent.

        Reply
  6. Michael Long
    Michael Long says:

    Great review Alan! From a four season perspective, how would you compare the Dirigo 2 to the Stratospire Li?

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Hi Michael,
      And excellent Question. First, they are both great options and represent the bright future of sophisticated single walled tents. So I am just going to point out some differences between the tents.

      The Dirigo 2 has 20% more floor area 32.5 ft2 vs 26.9 ft2. Both have similarly sloping walls and peak height so the Dirigo 2 has an edge on livable volume.
      Stratospire Li Floor Area: 45 in W x 86 in L | 26.9 ft2
      Dirigo 2 Floor Area: 52″ (W) x 90″ (L) | 32.5sq. ft.

      Stratospire is a more flexible tent since the outer and inner tents can be used independently or you can just take the outer when bugs aren’t bad and save weigh. It’s fully double walled so if you anticipate non-freezing condensation then the Stratospire might get the edge. Countering this is the larger area of the Dirigo to that might go a lot of the distance to keeping you away from the ends of the tent. And the Dirigo has WP/B panels on the end. So it might be a wash between the two on wet condensation management even tho the Stratospire is double walled.

      Dirigo 2 is stronger as the poles tent walls and floor create an integrated and tensioned structure. So it will be better when exposed to high winds or heavy snow loads. And again its extra area and event panels on the ends of the tent may more than compensate for lack of double wall on the ends of the tent. But since its winter its likely to be freezing condensation which would give the Dirigo 2 a nod for its larger area. And since its winter you’ll be spending more time in the tent and likely with more gear where extra area may make a difference.

      Finally the Stratospire is $100 less expensive. Hope this quick and dirty analysis helps. Best, -alan

      Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Hi Bret, nice to hear from you. Glad that you are happy with the Duplex! And I can certainly see price and weight being factors. For my curiosity, what has been your experience with the Duplex in high winds, say over 30 mph. Wishing you a great year of trekking. Warmest, -alan & alison

      Reply
      • Bret
        Bret says:

        Sorry my bad the Zpacks Duplex has been on my wish list, but I blew my play money on GooseFeetGear down jacket because of you! It’s super nice and I like to stay warm. This tent looks like a DCF version of the LightHeart Duo. I hope you also have a great year. Bret.

        Reply

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