Method to Manage Hammock Tarp Doors

Great Method to Manage Hammock Tarp Doors

This is an excellent Method to Manage Hammock Tarp Doors. It’s fast and simple to use. It keeps the tarp doors neatly and securely out of the way in dry weather or when you are getting in and out of the hammock. But it quickly secures the tarp doors if needed—like when a rain storm quickly moves in. This is a great do-it-yourself DIY project—instructions are below.

I learned about this Method to Manage Hammock Tarp Doors from David Meck of Hammeck at a fall hammock hang along the Appalachian Trail in PA. After the hammock hang, David kindly sent me some photos of his setup. (BTW my wife, Alison currently uses an Envy-S Hammeck.)

If this post interests you you might also like these two gear lists that feature hammock camping:
Practical Light Gear List Appalachian Trail (5-6 lb) and 8 Pound – Appalachian Trail Gear List and this three part intro to hammock camping: Hammock Camping Part I: Advantages & disadvantages versus ground systems

This is a Great DIY Project 

Materials

Notes

  • You need to appropriately alternate male and female clips ends. Clips need to correctly mate in both open-and-stowed position (Picture 1), & in the closed position (Picture 3 & Picture 5) .
  • Use about 3 ft. of shock cord attached to each clip. This is a starting point as tarps are different.

Instructions – Method to Manage Hammock Tarp Doors

The instructions on how to setup this “Method to Manage Hammock Tarp Doors” are in the photo captions below. The tarp pictured is a Hammock Gear Standard Cuben Fiber Tarp with doors

Method to Manage Hammock Tarp Doors

Photo 1: This shows the attachment points for the door cordage and hardware. On the top, each door corner’s D-ring has about 3 feet of shock cord tied to it with a clip at the other end. The two door clips fasten to each other in the middle, “Detail,” to secure the doors in the open-and-stowed position. The bottom two arrows indicate where clips are attached to lower D-rings (these are used to secure the doors in the closed position). [Photo D. Meck]

hammock-doors-1-1200

Photo 2: Detail of Photo 1 showing the Safety Side Release Buckle clips securing the doors in the open-and-stowed position. Note that you need to make sure you have the right female-male connections to work in both open-and-stowed position (Picture 1), & in the closed position (Picture 3 & Picture 5). [Photo D. Meck]

hammock-doors-2-1200

This shows the left door closed and attached to the mating clip on the opposite side of the tarp (yellow arrow on lower right). On the lower left arrow you can see the hanging clip for the opposite (right) door that is currently in the open-and-stowed position. In the upper right you can see the two right-hand-side doors clipped in the open-and-stowed position. [Photo D. Meck]

hammock-doors-4-1200

Photo 4: Detail of Photo 3 showing the shock cord and clip from the left (left arrow) door secured to the clip in the lower right. [Photo D. Meck]

hammock-doors-5-1200

Photo 5: Shows both doors closed and secured to clips on the opposite tarp side (yellow arrows). [Photo D. Meck]

 

21 replies
  1. DSoz
    DSoz says:

    So am I to understand that when ordering the Winter Palace I don’t need to add the door tie-backs if I’m using this set-up?

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      No you don’t absolutely need them using them with this setup. Although at only $13, it’s a nice option to have if you don’t use the doors all the time. It gets them fully out of the way all the time, so you can just un-stuff and pitch the tarp w/o having to deal with the doors. Best, -alan

      Reply
  2. Bruce Johnson
    Bruce Johnson says:

    This worked great for me. I used the 1/8 elastic cord, but I wonder if you didn’t use the 3/32. There is very little stress on any of the lines, and they are very clean to put away. Seems that the smaller line would look better and be a tiny bit lighter. Thanks for the article! It cleaned up my hang.

    Reply
  3. Mike B.
    Mike B. says:

    Great set-up! Any suggestions on where I could find the safety side release clips? If not, what size are the clips?
    Thanks!

    Reply
  4. Brett
    Brett says:

    So I’m going to be doing this to my HG Tarp with doors. One last thing I can’t find an answer to: How long is the length of shock cord on each side?

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Brett, every tarp is a bit different. I suggest that you spread the tarp on the floor and fold the doors back, emulating the configuration in the lead photo for the post. Then you can assemble the shock cords and clips very close to the correct lengths. Obviously you want them un-stretchd to be slightly shorter than the distance between the two door corners. Enjoy that great tarp! -alan

      Reply
      • Brett
        Brett says:

        Thanks!

        I understand tarps can be different, but I’ve got the exact same tarp demonstrated here, so I’ll start with three and a half feet or so per clip and go from there.

        The last problem I have is figuring out what knots to tie to these clips. I’m not good enough with knots to recognize it. I understand there’s a Prusik loop on the end, but I’ve got no idea what you’ve used to tie that loop. It’s not a Figure-8 as that slips and looks nothing like yours. I’ve spent an hour or so pouring over Grog’s knots and I’m at a loss here.

        What knot is used to tie the loop there?

        Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      In the picture is is a figure 8-stopper knot that won’t pass through the D-ring. The line is passed through the clip and then both tag ends are put through the D-ring. Then a figure-8 stopper knot is tied with the tag ends to prevent the line from being pulled through the D-ring.

      Reply
  5. B-Square
    B-Square says:

    Alan, I was wondering if your safety clips are difficult to release? The two pinchers are way too small and I don’t consider my hands that large, not small mind you. I purchased mine thru Make Your Own Gear from Dutch. I was really disappointed because your idea is clean, light weight, and flexible. I’m thinking I’ll try Mitten hooks instead?

    Reply
  6. Dusey
    Dusey says:

    Any reason the doors couldn’t also be “put away” on the inside of the tarp? (just thinking about not having to get too wet should a sudden storm come through.) I love this solution to easy handling of doors!

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Pretty sure this would work on the inside as well. Drier to undo when it’s raining. But easier to setup and manage most of the time when it is not raining. -a

      Reply
  7. Jon L.
    Jon L. says:

    I’m curious, what is your guy-line set up? I’m currently using 1.1 dyneema cord with reflective tracers attached to a prusik knots that are larks headed on each corner.

    I’m always looking for new/different tarp rigging ideas.

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Alan Dixon
      Alan Dixon says:

      Jon, apologies for the late reply. I was in the backcountry when you posted your comment. I typically use bright orange Lawson Reflective Cord. For me it has a good balance of weight, ease of handling & knot tying. And yes, tracer cords are essential for not tripping on guylines and knocking your shelter down at night. I typically use a truckers hitch to secure the guyline to stakes (usually something like a MSR Ground Hog Stake). Not the very lightest setup but likely close to the most functional setup. Hope this helps. -a

      Reply
  8. Jay
    Jay says:

    Which tarp is this the HG hex with doors or the HG Winterplace and what length is the ridgeline and how long is your hammock in the pic? I’m trying to decide between the two – thanks!

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

    Leave a Reply

    Want to join the discussion?
    Feel free to contribute!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.